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Saturday Sessions
Sat 5 March 2011

Click a session name for more information and booking details.

If you know the name of the author you wish to see at the Perth Writers Festival and want to see the sessions they are involved in, click here and select the author's name from the list.

9.30-10am - 11am-12pm - 12.30-1.30pm - 2-3pm
3.30-4.30pm - 5-6pm - 6.30-7pm - 8-9pm

9:30-10:30am
Octagon Theatre
SCIENCE IS THE NEW ART
Annie Proulx has long been influenced by the natural world, making her home on 640 acres of Wyoming wetlands and prairie purchased from the Nature Conservancy. Tim Flannery is a writer, scientist and explorer who delves into our relationship with the planet. They discuss the connection between art and science. Chair: Stephen Romei.
The University Club Theatre CRIMINALLY MINDED
Jeff Lindsay and Leah Giarratano get deep inside the minds of psychopaths in their latest novels. Is writing about society’s nasty side therapeutic or distressing? Join them for a conversation on the ups and downs of crime writing. Chair: Ben Martin.
Dolphin Theatre
INSPIRED BY NATURE
The natural world is often a starting point for creativity. Gregory Day, Suzanne Falkiner, Adrian Hyland and James Bradley consider the role landscape plays in firing up a writer’s imagination. Chair: Mark Tredinnick.
Festival Tent
FANTASY AFFAIRS
What is it about fantasy and science fiction that is so attractive for teens and adults alike? Three outstanding writers working within the genre, Bernard Beckett, Lev Grossman and Will Elliott, share their thoughts. Chair: Ara Jansen.
The University Club Banquet Hall
PEOPLE WHO EAT DARKNESS
Richard Lloyd Parry’s gripping book follows the story of young British woman Lucie Blackman, who fell prey to unspeakable evil while working as a hostess in Japan. Eight years earlier, Perth woman Carita Ridgeway was a victim of Joji Obara. Richard’s examination of the crimes offers insight into the societies in which they occurred. Chair: Geraldine Mellet.

11am-12pm
Octagon Theatre
LIVES LIKE LOADED GUNS
Acclaimed biographer Lyndall Gordon explores the life and work of poet Emily Dickinson. The author of almost 1800 poems, but with only ten published in her lifetime, Dickinson has become a mythic character. In her original and page-turning biography, Gordon offers a fascinating new interpretation of the poet’s life.
The University Club Theatre IN A STRANGE ROOM
In a Strange Room by novelist Damon Galgut was shortlisted for the 2010 Man Booker Prize and is a beautiful evocation of place and human connection. He talks to Ramona Koval of ABC Radio National’s The Book Show about the nature of memory, the compulsion to travel and relationships between wanderers.
Dolphin Theatre
HOME COMFORTS
The idea of home can have many different meanings, from physical and geographical spaces to the comfort and familiarity to be found in a home library or captured in a piece of art. Carmel Bird, Hetti Perkins and Brenda Walker contemplate what home means to them. Chair: Donna Ward.
Festival Tent
FROM THE BOOK TO THE EASEL
Wayne Ashton and Ron Brooks work between two very different mediums: literature and art. They talk about the creative challenges each brings.
The University Club Banquet Hall
BREAKING THE MOULD
The latest books by Adam Ross, Miguel Syjuco and Rodney Hall are playful disruptions of traditional literary forms. From interrupted narratives to unique perspectives to blending truth and fiction, they discuss why they moved away from formal narrative structures to tell their stories.

12.30-1.30pm
Octagon Theatre
IT'S A DOG'S LIFE
Andrew O’Hagan’s unique new novel is a fascinating insight into the life of Marilyn Monroe, provided by her canine companion Maf in the last few years of her life. A shrewd observer of the modern age, Maf is a great vehicle to explore the nature of celebrity and the height of 1960s political, cultural and literary life in America. Chair: Stephen Romei.
The University Club Theatre MINDING THE PLANET
We all agree the planet is in danger and yet we seem unable to work together to agree on a solution. Psychologist Dorothy Rowe and scientist Ian Lowe consider what it will take to persuade us this issue is serious enough to act.
Dolphin Theatre
SAND - CANCELLED

The Sand session is cancelled because Robert Drewe and John Kinsella have withdrawn from the 2011 Perth Writers Festival.

Festival Tent
MASTERCLASS
Debut novelists Kirsten Tranter and Sophie Gee have spent years studying the classics, from English Renaissance literature to 18th-century satire. They discuss what the masters can teach us when it comes to writing fiction. Chair: Angela Meyer.
The University Club Banquet Hall
THE MAGIC OF OZ
Is there a uniquely Australian fantasy voice? Do the Australian character and landscape influence the nature of our fantasies? Margo Lanagan, Anthony Eaton and Will Elliott consider how living in Australia influences their writing. Chair: Helen Merrick.

2-3pm
Octagon Theatre
TRIAL BY MEDIA
The relationship between the media and judicial system can be fraught; the media is often accused of scaremongering, and yet there are times when the courts get it wrong. Journalists Colleen Egan, Richard Lloyd Parry and former Supreme Court Judge Ken Crispin consider the role of the fourth estate within the justice system. Chair: Lawrence Apps.
The University Club Theatre GAZA: ZIONISM AND ANTI-ZIONISM
The invasion of Gaza in 2008 provoked worldwide condemnation and questions aboutIsrael’s right to exist. Some asked why other nations acting unjustly don’t face debate about the validity of their sovereignty. Raimond Gaita and Antony Loewenstein discuss the issue.
Dolphin Theatre
GETTING INSIDE THEIR HEADS
Lyndall Gordon and Hazel Rowley have written ground-breaking new biographies of Emily Dickinson and Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. They consider the difficulties of writing about well-known subjects and the need to put aside traditional theories to discover new interpretations. Chair: Rosemary Sayer.
Festival Tent
PEOPLE LIKE US?
From pregnancies and new motherhood to failed marriages and empty nests, the new fiction of Carmel Bird, Natasha Lester and Fiona McGregor explores the joys, challenges and messiness of the lives of apparently ordinary people. Chair: Terri-ann White.
The University Club Banquet Hall
GIVING VOICE TO MEMORIES
Rodney Hall, Kate Holden and Ron Brooks have written three very different memoirs, utilising three very different styles. They talk to Rachel Robertson about finding the right voice to tell their story.

3.30-4.30pm
Octagon Theatre
LETTERS FROM CHINA
Yan Lianke is one of China’s greatest living authors. Currently under heavy scrutiny from authorities, he battles to maintain creative integrity. His latest novel, Dream of Ding Village, was inspired by the AIDS epidemic in Henan, where thousands were infected through criminally negligent blood-selling practices. Chair: Rosemary Sayer.
The University Club Theatre THE FINGER
In a collision between art and science, history and pop culture, acclaimed art historian Angus Trumble examines the finger from every possible angle. He talks with Alan Dodge about different representations of the finger in art from Buddhist statues in Kyoto to Rubens’ fondness for gloves.
Dolphin Theatre
ALL IN A DAY'S WORK
From researching Durban slums to trawling Perth’s seedy underworld to delving into the psyches of Australia’s most fearsome criminals, writing crime fiction isnever dull. Malla Nunn, David Whish-Wilson and Leah Giarratano discuss the stories behind their new novels. Chair: Ara Jansen.
Festival Tent
NIGHTMARES OF WAR
Stephen Daisley and Chris Womersley’s atmospheric new novels are stories of war and transformation. They explore the devastating effects of war and its legacy on returning soldiers. Chair Stephen Romei.
The University Club Banquet Hall
FREE VERSE
Acclaimed Australian poets Kate Lilley and John Tranter share exhilarating readings of their new poetry. Chair: Peter Rose.

5-6pm
Octagon Theatre
BACKSTAGE POLITICS
After 50 years in politics, arts and themedia, broadcaster and columnist Phillip Adams has plenty of stories to tell about his time rubbing up against pollies. He talks about his new book Backstage Politics.
The University Club Theatre AMERICAN ICONS
So much has been written about icons Marilyn Monroe and the Roosevelts that finding a new angle can be difficult. Andrew O’Hagan and Hazel Rowley explore these mythic individuals on a more personal level in their new books, one fiction and one biography. Chair: Angela Meyer.
Dolphin Theatre
ECCENTRIC CHARACTERS
Gregory Day and Toni Jordan’s witty new novels are populated with casts of idiosyncratic characters. They talk to Ben Martin about writing with a comedic touch.
Festival Tent
NEW VOICES, OLD LANDS
Miguel Syjuco was awarded the Man Asia Literary Award for his unpublished novel Illustrado while Anjali Joseph was included in The Daily Telegraph’s top 20 authors under 40. Their exciting novels are fresh visions of two old countries, the Philippines and India.
Arts Courtyard Stage
WESTERLY RANDOLPH STOW TRIBUTE
West Australian writer Randolph Stow showed us a way to write about ourselves. Gail Jones, Gabrielle Carey, Richard Rossiter and Dickon Oxenburgh discuss his writing and its ongoing influence. Chair: Delys Bird.

6.30-7.30pm
Octagon Theatre
DEXTER IS DELICIOUS
Everyone’s favourite serial killer, Dexter, is now a proud family man, but has marriage and family life tamed his bloodlust? Join Jeff Lindsay as he discusses his new Dexter novel with James Lush.
The Great Court FEAST OF WORDS
Join us for a Bacchanalian feast for body and mind as international and national storytellers infuse gourmet food and wine with flavourful readings. Authors Joanne Harris, Armistead Maupin, Simon Armitage and Adam Ross delight and transfix while you feast on an indulgent three-course banquet and reds and whites from the award-winning Watershed Premium Wines.
Sunken Garden THE MASTER: HENRY JAMES (BOOK CLUB EVENT)
Kirsten Tranter and Peter Rose’s new novels reference Henry James’ writing, particularly The Portrait of a Lady and The Aspern Papers. They consider the influence of Henry James on contemporary writing and their work. 

8-9pm
Octagon Theatre
THE DEMOCRACY DEBATE
With the growing influence of the Asia and Pacific region, the resurgence of religious fundamentalism, widening inequality and Wikileaks, do we have to rethink how democracy works? Tariq Ali, Ken Crispin, John Keane and Antony Loewenstein share their thoughts. Chair: Dr Carmen Lawrence.
The Great Court FEAST OF WORDS
Join us for a Bacchanalian feast for body and mind as international and national storytellers infuse gourmet food and wine with flavourful readings. Authors Joanne Harris, Armistead Maupin, Simon Armitage and Adam Ross delight and transfix while you feast on an indulgent three-course banquet and reds and whites from the award-winning Watershed Premium Wines.
Sunken Garden
INDIGO LAUNCH
Join us as Les Murray launches the final volume of literary journal indigo. The event featurs readings, music and a special appearance by award-winning author Mark Tredinnick and the inaugural winner of the $5,000 Nature Conservancy Prize for Nature Writing. Chair: Donna Ward.

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