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Monday Sessions
Mon 7 March 2011

Below is a list of sessions - click a session name for more information and booking details.

If you know the name of the author you wish to see at the Perth Writers Festival and want to see the sessions they are involved in, click here and select the author's name from the list.

9.30-10am - 11am-12pm - 12.30-1.30pm - 2-3pm
3.30-4.30pm - 5-6pm - 6.30-7pm - 8-9pm

9:30-10:30am
The University Club Theatre LITERARY POSTCARDS
From fiction to memoir, the new books of Damon Galgut, Kate Holden and Maria Tumarkin explore the idea of travelling to find oneself. They talk to Geordie Williamson about their writing.
Dolphin Theatre
TURTH TELLING
What capacity is there for information exchange in repressive regimes? Chinese author Yan Lianke has had his novels banned in his home country while freelance journalist and author Antony Loewenstein has looked at these questions in the Middle East. They discuss freedom of expression and the ways restrictive controls can be overcome.
The University Club Banquet Hall
REVERBERATIONS FROM THE PAST
What happens when the past won’t leave you alone? The new novels of Gail Jones, Jon Bauer and Natasha Lester explore the impact of childhood and complicated histories. Chair: Donna Ward.
Festival Tent
STARTING EARLY
Being stung by the reading bug as a child opens up a whole new world of excitement and possibilities. We’ve asked some of our favourite children’s writers to share the books that started their reading journeys. Join Wendy Orr, Brian Falkner, Andrew Joyner and Sue Whiting on this trip down memory lane.

11am-12pm
The University Club Theatre TWISTED TALES
Lev Grossman’s new novel is both a critique and homage to some of the fantasy genre’s greatest writers, including CS Lewis and JK Rowling. Margo Lanagan subverts traditional fairy tale forms to produce wildly original and dark short stories. They discuss their unique take on fantasy writing. Chair: Sarah Schadlow.
Dolphin Theatre
CONFOUNDING EXPECTATIONS
John Tranter’s new collection includes radical revisions, mistranslations and multilingual dealings, while Simon Armitage writes with an air of playful misrule. Join these two internationally renowned poets for a wide-ranging conversation about their writing. Chair: William Yeoman.
The University Club Banquet Hall
REEL TIME
Novelist Malla Nunn and Ron Elliott have backgrounds in screenwriting and film, while Robert Drewe has been intimately involved in the film adaptations of his books. They talk about the transition between fiction and film. Chair: Mark Naglazas.
Festival Tent
CULTURAL CONVERSATIONS
Kim Scott and Simone Lazaroo are writers interested in the interface between different cultures. They talk about the ways they explore cultural exchange within their fiction.

12.30-1.30pm
The University Club Theatre TALLER WHEN PRONE
One of Australia’s best-loved poets, Les Murray, takes us through his new volume of poems, Taller When Prone. Combining a mastery of form with a matchless ear for Australian vernacular, these poems evoke rural life here and abroad. Chair: Dennis Haskell.
Dolphin Theatre
SETTING IT UP
Place is integral to the new novels of Stephen Daisley, Kirsten Tranter and Gregory Day. They talk to Ara Jansen about creating vibrant and well realised locations in their writing.
The University Club Banquet Hall
HEARTS ON THEIR SLEEVES
Brenda Walker, Maria Tumarkin, Fiona McGregor and Raimond Gaita discuss how the very personal act of writing about their lives and experiences in memoir affected those lives. Chair: Rosemary Sayer.
Festival Tent
PROTECTED PLACES
Victoria Laurie’s new book is an exploration of one of Western Australia’s most beautiful areas, the Kimberley. President of the Australian Conservation Foundation Ian Lowe has worked on preserving some of Australia’s most unique environments. They discuss the survival of these majestic sites.

2-3pm
The University Club Theatre MEN'S BUSINESS
Roger McDonald’s When Colts Ran is an epic portrayal of Australian manhood, while Chris Womersley’s Bereft is an exploration of one man’s life and grief. They consider writing about masculinity.
Dolphin Theatre
BEHIND THE POLICE TAPE
Journalist Colleen Egan and novelist David Whish-Wilson have spent years researching, investigating and writing about two of Perth’s most high-profile crimes. They talk with Terri-ann White about the stories behind their books and the different ways they have told them, from truth to fiction.
The University Club Banquet Hall
CAPTURING THE WORLD IN WORDS
James Bradley and Stephen Scourfield have spent many hours considering how a well-placed word can capture the essence of a place, both in their own writing and in the writing of others. They talk to Chair Geordie Williamson.
Festival Tent
THE HARD YARDS
Many long hard days spent in musty libraries and microfiche files are part of a writer’s daily life. Biographer Suzanne Falkiner and novelist Amanda Curtin discuss their approaches to research and the wonderful journeys that they have embarked on.

3.30-4.30pm

Octagon      

Theatre

THE OBAMA SYNDROME
Tariq Ali argues that very little has changed since George W Bush left the White House – especially when it comes to foreign affairs. But while the ‘war on terror’ continues abroad, at home the honeymoon is definitely over with a Republican surge in the recent mid-term elections. Join writer and filmmaker Tariq Ali for this thought-provoking lecture.
The University Club Theatre HOOKED
Journalists Richard Lloyd Parry and Caroline Overington discuss the real life stories that get under your skin as a journalist, from domestic crime to international intrigues. What happens when you can’t let them go? Chair: Lawrence Apps.

Dolphin Theatre

THE GRIFFITH REVIEW: WAYS OF SEEING
Ian Lowe and Julienne van Loon discuss the role of ‘certainty’ and ‘play’ in stalling or advancing human knowledge and development. Chair: Carmen Lawrence
The University Club Banquet Hall
ON GRIEF
How do you write about grief without sounding mawkish and resorting to clichés? Stephen Daisley, Natasha Lester and Carmel Bird consider the ways they explore the effects of loss within their writing. Chair:Dennis Haskell.
Festival Tent
MORE THAN CRIME
Malla Nunn and Adrian Hyland are authors using the crime genre as an opportunity to explore political issues in their writing. They talk about the potential for weaving complex issues into a thrilling story.

5-6pm
The University Club Theatre TRUTH AND LIES
Former Supreme Court Judge Ken Crispin has spent most of hiscareer determining truth and justice, while psychologist Dorothy Rowe is renowned for her work on how we communicate, and most recently, the reasons we avoid truth. Join them for a conversation about truth and lies.

Dolphin Theatre

SELECTED POEMS OF FRANCIS WEBB (BOOK LAUNCH)
Editor Toby Davidson and Publisher Terri-ann White are joined by poets Lucy Dougan, Mal McKimmie, Marcella Polain, Andrew Taylor, Morgan Yasbincek and Simon Armitage, who talk about their impressions of Francis Webb and read his poems.
The University Club Banquet Hall
ELSEWHERE
Wayne Ashton’s magical new novel shifts between hemispheres and generations, while Ian Reid explores the changes international travel has brought to people’s lives in the 19th century. They talk about their works, set a long way from home – whatever ‘home’ might mean.
Festival Tent
FIVE BELLS
Gail Jones is one of the shining stars in Australia’s contemporary literary scene. The intelligence and intensity of her language is a hallmark of her novels. In conversation with Rosemary Sayer, she discusses her new novel, Five Bells.

6.30-7.30pm

Octagon          

Theatre

ANDREW O'HAGAN: THE WEST (CLOSING ADDRESS)
Twice Man Booker-nominated novelist Andrew O’Hagan grew up on the west coast of Scotland. His people looked west to the Ireland they came from, and further west to the America that was coming to dominate their lives. For O’Hagan, the concept of The West – literature’s dream territory, cinema’s golden land – is at the centre of some of the greatest debates in modern life.

In this illuminating and entertaining talk, the novelist takes Perth as his starting point to argue how notions of Westerness surround us. What is geography to the imagination now? Did The West give the west a bad name? And is Perth the point where west and east finally dissolve?
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